News & Events

  • Hany Farid has just been elected an IEEE Fellow “for seminal contributions to the field of photo-forensics and its application to fighting the exploitation of children around the globe.”

    Hany is being recognized for his research in image analysis and digital forensics, a field he pioneered at Dartmouth. Among many other things, Hany has developed mathematical and computational techniques to determine whether images, videos, or audio recordings have been altered. A noteworthy...

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  • “What is truth?” asked Pontius Pilate at the trial of Jesus Christ. You’d think that in the past two millennia we’d have gotten better at knowing, but technology is a two-edged sword in this respect. “The forensics guy and the forger share similar skillsets,” says Hany Farid, a professor of computer science at Dartmouth College who is one of the foremost experts on unraveling the digital mazes constructed to conceal or alter images and sound. And tools of the trade that once belonged to the...

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  • A watch that works in multiple dimensions and a smart ring that provides calendar alerts are among the top technology Dartmouth College will bring to the 30th ACM User Interface Software and Technology Symposium (UIST 2017).

    Other technology to be introduced by the Dartmouth team includes a thumb-tip recognition technique that optimizes interaction with computer applications.

    The research projects, products of Dartmouth's human computer interface lab, have been chosen by UIST...

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  • Social media platforms had to answer to Congress for the part it played in Russian influence in the 2016 elections. Dartmouth computer science professor Hany Farid talks about the tools Facebook, Twitter and Google can use to stop foreign interference in the future.

    Listen to the full interview here.

  • During 2016-2017 Professor Andrew Campbell took leave from Dartmouth and joined Google and Verily (Google's life science startup) as a visiting research scientist working in the Android group in Mountain View on new wearables and at Verily in South San Francisco on mental health sensing. Now back at Dartmouth he is busy working on 3 new awards from NIH and IARPA with students in the DartNet lab.

    The new projects include a collaboration between Dartmouth CS and the Tuck business school...

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  • Sex trafficking is a growing problem that has moved from the street to the smart phone. The National Center for Missing and Exploited Children (NCMEC)reports an 846 percent increase in reports of suspected child sex trafficking from 2010 to 2015, which it found to be “directly correlated to the increased use of the Internet to sell children for sex.” Victims of illegal sex trafficking have found it difficult to seek justice in the courts due to the blanket liability protection provided in...

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  • Allison Chuang, a rising junior majoring in CS, participated in Rewriting the Code this summer in Durham, NC. Rewriting the Code is focused on recruiting,
    retaining and advancing women in tech. Sue Harnett recently wrote an article about the program and Allison's involvement in it. Check out the full article here.

  • The Dartmouth College Department of Computer Science invites applications for four tenure-track faculty positions at the level of assistant professor or associate professor. We seek candidates who will be excellent researchers and teachers in the following four areas: (1) graphics, (2) robotics, (3) machine learning; and (4) systems. Outstanding applicants in other areas will also...

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  • Xia Zhou has been named one of N2Women's "Rising Stars in Networking and Communications" this year. The "N2Women: Rising Stars in Networking and Communications” list is an annual list that focuses on amazing women at the beginning of their careers.

    Of course we at Dartmouth already knew this of Xia, but its nice to know others agree!

    For 2017, in alphabetical order (by last name), here are the 10 N2Women: Rising Stars in Networking and Communications...

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  • It turns out humans aren’t very good at recognizing when an image has been manipulated, even if the change is fairly substantial. Hany Farid talks with Popular Science, sharing a few tips for authenticating images on your own.

    Check out the full Popular Science article.

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