Faculty

Prof. Farid discusses online extremism on Science Friday

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Back in the early 2000s, the internet had a problem with child pornography. For its part, the United States hadn’t anticipated the explosion of illegal images that had come online in the early days of the internet. Tracking these illegal activities became much more difficult, and removing all trace of the images from the World Wide Web seemed nearly impossible. So government officials turned to Silicon Valley for help.

Jessica Fan '17 wins CRA's Outstanding Undergraduate Researcher Honorable Mention

Congratulations to Jessica Fan '17, who received the Computing Research Association's (CRA) Outstanding Undergraduate Researcher Honorable Mention for PhD-granting institutions. This award program recognizes undergraduate students in North American universities who show outstanding research potential in an area of computing research.

Jessica Fan worked together with Professor Tom Cormen on the research paper:

Cormen, T. H. and Fan J. C., "Dense Gray Codes, or Easy Ways to Generate Cyclic and Non-Cyclic Gray Codes For the First n Whole Numbers," 54th Annual Allerton Conference on Communication, Control, and Computing, October 2016.

Hany Farid Honored by the National Academy of Inventors

From Dartmouth News:

Hany Farid, the Albert Bradley 1915 Third Century Professor and chair of the Department of Computer Science, has been named a fellow of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI).

NAI fellow status is granted to academic inventors “who have demonstrated a highly prolific spirit of innovation in creating or facilitating outstanding inventions that have made a tangible impact on quality of life, economic development, and the welfare of society.” NAI President Paul Sanberg wrote to Farid, “Congratulations on this great achievement and recognition as a truly prolific academic inventor.”

Wojciech Jarosz and team render sand, snow and salt

Be it sand, snow or a bowl of spices, rendering massive aggregations of granular materials is a challenge for animators. A new method developed by researchers from Disney Research, ETH Zurich and Dartmouth's very own Prof. Wojciech Jarosz, proposes a method to handle this problem with unprecedented accuracy and computational efficiency. The technique makes it possible to show fine detail - the varying shapes and colors of grains and glints of light - as well as the smoother appearance that characterizes granular materials when seen at a greater distance. Check out the animated results from the research paper:

Hany Farid appointed to Endowed Chair

See the full coverage at Dartmouth Now.

Every year Dartmouth names a few of its top faculty to endowed professorships, recognizing their scholarship, teaching, and service to the College community as models of Dartmouth’s liberal arts ideal. We congratulate our very own Dr. Hany Farid, who was appointed to the Albert Bradley 1915 Third Century Professorship.

In the Dartmouth Now interview, Prof. Farid says:

Each fall I teach “Computer Science 1” to around 200 students. For many, this is their first introduction to programming, and about half are first-year students taking their first Dartmouth class. This is an awesome opportunity and responsibility to expose students to the power, creativity, and beauty that underlie our field. My goal is not to pump out more computer science majors, but to show all students—from the humanities, social sciences, and sciences—how computing can be leveraged to further their interests and passions, whatever they may be.

Electronics 360 features Prof. Zhou's Light-Sensing System

Dartmouth researchers are “using the power of the light all around us to develop a light-sensing system that tracks a person’s behavior continuously in real-time, without being overbearing,” writes the website Electronics 360 in a feature about the system.

“The StarLight system has a variety of potential applications, including virtual reality without on-body controllers and real-time health monitoring. The new system builds upon the team’s previous work, called license, and reduces the number of intrusive sensors while overcoming furniture blockage and supporting user mobility,” the website writes.

Fighting Online Extremism

Dartmouth College computer science professor Hany Farid — using funding from Microsoft Corp. — has developed technology to help scrub extremist content from the internet.

Working with the nonprofit think tank Counter Extremism Project, Farid built software capable of identifying and tracking photo, video and audio files, even if they’ve been altered. The software, unveiled Friday, would allow websites such as Facebook Inc. to automatically catch flagged content and remove it or prevent it from being uploaded.

Several news sources are discussing this research. Read and/or watch the full overage at:

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