faculty research

Prof. Hany Farid honored as a 2018 Fellow of the IEEE

Hany Farid has just been elected an IEEE Fellow “for seminal contributions to the field of photo-forensics and its application to fighting the exploitation of children around the globe.”

Hany is being recognized for his research in image analysis and digital forensics, a field he pioneered at Dartmouth. Among many other things, Hany has developed mathematical and computational techniques to determine whether images, videos, or audio recordings have been altered. A noteworthy application was Hany's forensic analysis that demonstrated the authenticity of a controversial photograph of Lee Harvey Oswald holding the alleged assassination rifle. Hany also helped develop a system to find and remove online images pertaining to child exploitation, and is developing a system to scrub the internet of extremist-related content.

“Hany’s research is both technically groundbreaking and incredibly impactful,” says Interim Provost David Kotz ’86, the Champion International Professor in the Department of Computer Science. “Congratulations to him. This is a great honor.”

Dartmouth to debut wearables that warn and wow at UIST 2017

A watch that works in multiple dimensions and a smart ring that provides calendar alerts are among the top technology Dartmouth College will bring to the 30th ACM User Interface Software and Technology Symposium (UIST 2017).

Other technology to be introduced by the Dartmouth team includes a thumb-tip recognition technique that optimizes interaction with computer applications.

The research projects, products of Dartmouth's human computer interface lab, have been chosen by UIST 2017 to feature alongside some of the world's most innovative technology.

"Understanding and improving how humans interact with computers are essential parts of technology development," said Xing-Dong Yang, assistant professor of computer science at Dartmouth. "We look forward to UIST as a unique opportunity to share ideas on innovation."

See details in EurekAlert.

Prof. Campbell wins 3 new grants for $13M on mobile sensing

During 2016-2017 Professor Andrew Campbell took leave from Dartmouth and joined Google and Verily (Google's life science startup) as a visiting research scientist working in the Android group in Mountain View on new wearables and at Verily in South San Francisco on mental health sensing. Now back at Dartmouth he is busy working on 3 new awards from NIH and IARPA with students in the DartNet lab.

The new projects include a collaboration between Dartmouth CS and the Tuck business school funded by IARPA to study collaboration in the workplace using mobile phones, wearables and specialized IOT devices. Another project funded by NIH between Dartmouth CS and UW is investigating auditory verbal hallucination using mobile phones. Finally, we are following 100 undergrads across their 4 years at Dartmouth College as part of another NIH funded project with PBS to study the stress and strain of undergraduate students.

Prof. David Kotz and Kobby Essien Win Prestigious SIGMOBILE Test-of-Time Award

David Kotz and Kobby Essien received mobile computing's most prestigious award for their technical paper:  "Analysis of a Campus-wide Wireless Network".

From the SIGMOBILE website:

This paper was the first to systematically demonstrate how to measure and understand a production-scale wireless network, which was previously considered an impenetrable black box. This led to an incredible amount of follow-on work, with the measurement methods and analysis mechanisms proposed in this paper still being used. This paper was also the spark for the creation of the CRAWDAD data repository, which has been of immense value to the wireless research community.

Check out the full story, including information about the other awardees at the SIGMOBILE ToT award website

You can find more information about this research project at Dartmouth's campus-wide wireless network research page.

Prof. Farid discusses online extremism on Science Friday

Listen here.

Back in the early 2000s, the internet had a problem with child pornography. For its part, the United States hadn’t anticipated the explosion of illegal images that had come online in the early days of the internet. Tracking these illegal activities became much more difficult, and removing all trace of the images from the World Wide Web seemed nearly impossible. So government officials turned to Silicon Valley for help.

Jessica Fan '17 wins CRA's Outstanding Undergraduate Researcher Honorable Mention

Congratulations to Jessica Fan '17, who received the Computing Research Association's (CRA) Outstanding Undergraduate Researcher Honorable Mention for PhD-granting institutions. This award program recognizes undergraduate students in North American universities who show outstanding research potential in an area of computing research.

Jessica Fan worked together with Professor Tom Cormen on the research paper:

Cormen, T. H. and Fan J. C., "Dense Gray Codes, or Easy Ways to Generate Cyclic and Non-Cyclic Gray Codes For the First n Whole Numbers," 54th Annual Allerton Conference on Communication, Control, and Computing, October 2016.

Wojciech Jarosz and team render sand, snow and salt

Be it sand, snow or a bowl of spices, rendering massive aggregations of granular materials is a challenge for animators. A new method developed by researchers from Disney Research, ETH Zurich and Dartmouth's very own Prof. Wojciech Jarosz, proposes a method to handle this problem with unprecedented accuracy and computational efficiency. The technique makes it possible to show fine detail - the varying shapes and colors of grains and glints of light - as well as the smoother appearance that characterizes granular materials when seen at a greater distance. Check out the animated results from the research paper:

The Internet of Risky Things

In the aftermath of the Oct 21 Internet attacks, the New York Times writes of "A New Era of Internet Attacks Powered by Everyday Devices." One observer noted that society needs an "Unsafe at Any Speed" for this new era of the Internet of Things. Fortunately, Dartmouth Professor Sean Smith (Director of ISTS) has just written that—building on the work he and Prof Sergey Bratus have done on the smart grid, and on the Living/Learning course Smith taught in Summer 2015 in collaboration with DEN and ResEd.

You can preorder the book now on Amazon.

A Smartwatch That Works With One Hand

Smartwatches can be handy—perhaps too “handy,” given that they require both hands to operate. That can be a problem if your other hand is full, nonfunctioning or missing.

Researchers have tried a variety of approaches to help smartwatch users who lack a free hand, such as putting acoustic sensors on the watchband to capture inputs from finger-tapping. These efforts have concentrated mostly on enabling discrete commands, such as moving down a list of songs one at a time. Voice commands also can work for such functions, although the noise of speech isn’t always welcome.

Scientists at Dartmouth College and the University of Manitoba have been working on another approach: enabling continuous input—such as drawing letters and shapes or panning across a map—of the kind more typical of using a mouse or stylus. They hope to avoid relying on a lot of arm-tilting for these motions, since that tends to take the screen out of view.

CS Prof and team devise method to 3D print models that balance or breakdance

3DPrint.com is featuring a story about the recently published research which was co-authored by CS Professor Wojciech Jarosz in collaboration with Romain Prévost and Moritz Bächer of Disney Research and Professor Olga Sorkine-Hornung of ETH Zurich.

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