faculty research

Prof. Farid discusses online extremism on Science Friday

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Back in the early 2000s, the internet had a problem with child pornography. For its part, the United States hadn’t anticipated the explosion of illegal images that had come online in the early days of the internet. Tracking these illegal activities became much more difficult, and removing all trace of the images from the World Wide Web seemed nearly impossible. So government officials turned to Silicon Valley for help.

Jessica Fan '17 wins CRA's Outstanding Undergraduate Researcher Honorable Mention

Congratulations to Jessica Fan '17, who received the Computing Research Association's (CRA) Outstanding Undergraduate Researcher Honorable Mention for PhD-granting institutions. This award program recognizes undergraduate students in North American universities who show outstanding research potential in an area of computing research.

Jessica Fan worked together with Professor Tom Cormen on the research paper:

Cormen, T. H. and Fan J. C., "Dense Gray Codes, or Easy Ways to Generate Cyclic and Non-Cyclic Gray Codes For the First n Whole Numbers," 54th Annual Allerton Conference on Communication, Control, and Computing, October 2016.

Wojciech Jarosz and team render sand, snow and salt

Be it sand, snow or a bowl of spices, rendering massive aggregations of granular materials is a challenge for animators. A new method developed by researchers from Disney Research, ETH Zurich and Dartmouth's very own Prof. Wojciech Jarosz, proposes a method to handle this problem with unprecedented accuracy and computational efficiency. The technique makes it possible to show fine detail - the varying shapes and colors of grains and glints of light - as well as the smoother appearance that characterizes granular materials when seen at a greater distance. Check out the animated results from the research paper:

The Internet of Risky Things

In the aftermath of the Oct 21 Internet attacks, the New York Times writes of "A New Era of Internet Attacks Powered by Everyday Devices." One observer noted that society needs an "Unsafe at Any Speed" for this new era of the Internet of Things. Fortunately, Dartmouth Professor Sean Smith (Director of ISTS) has just written that—building on the work he and Prof Sergey Bratus have done on the smart grid, and on the Living/Learning course Smith taught in Summer 2015 in collaboration with DEN and ResEd.

You can preorder the book now on Amazon.

A Smartwatch That Works With One Hand

Smartwatches can be handy—perhaps too “handy,” given that they require both hands to operate. That can be a problem if your other hand is full, nonfunctioning or missing.

Researchers have tried a variety of approaches to help smartwatch users who lack a free hand, such as putting acoustic sensors on the watchband to capture inputs from finger-tapping. These efforts have concentrated mostly on enabling discrete commands, such as moving down a list of songs one at a time. Voice commands also can work for such functions, although the noise of speech isn’t always welcome.

Scientists at Dartmouth College and the University of Manitoba have been working on another approach: enabling continuous input—such as drawing letters and shapes or panning across a map—of the kind more typical of using a mouse or stylus. They hope to avoid relying on a lot of arm-tilting for these motions, since that tends to take the screen out of view.

CS Prof and team devise method to 3D print models that balance or breakdance

3DPrint.com is featuring a story about the recently published research which was co-authored by CS Professor Wojciech Jarosz in collaboration with Romain Prévost and Moritz Bächer of Disney Research and Professor Olga Sorkine-Hornung of ETH Zurich.

DartNets Lab's DarkLight Won Best Video Award in MobiCom'16

With the rise in wearables such as smartwatches and fitness trackers that rely on smart sensors, and the continued popularity of smartphones, smartdevices are taking our country by storm. Wireless data for such devices is typically beamed through Wi-Fi or Bluetooth, yet, the new wireless communication technology of “visible light communication (VLC),” has emerged as a new option albeit with limitations due to the challenges it faces in practice, such as being easily blocked or not being able to sustain transmission when light is off. Through a new Dartmouth project called “DarkLight,” researchers have developed and demonstrated for the first-time, how visible light can be used to transmit data even when the light appears dark or off. DarkLight provides a new communication primitive similar to infrared communication, however, it exploits the LED lights already around us rather than needing additional infrared emitters.

The study, “The DarkLight Rises: Visible Light Communication in the Dark,” was presented and demonstrated at “MobiCom 2016: The 22nd Annual International Conference on Mobile Computing and Networking” by Zhao Tian, the lead Ph.D. student for the project.

Electronics 360 features Prof. Zhou's Light-Sensing System

Dartmouth researchers are “using the power of the light all around us to develop a light-sensing system that tracks a person’s behavior continuously in real-time, without being overbearing,” writes the website Electronics 360 in a feature about the system.

“The StarLight system has a variety of potential applications, including virtual reality without on-body controllers and real-time health monitoring. The new system builds upon the team’s previous work, called license, and reduces the number of intrusive sensors while overcoming furniture blockage and supporting user mobility,” the website writes.

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