graduate students

Gabe Weaver Named Inaugural Dieckamp Fellow

Dr. Gabe Weaver received his PhD from Dartmouth in 2013. During his research career, Gabe has had stints at MIT’s Lincoln Laboratory and as a non-residential fellow at Harvard, where he designed an XML vocabulary to encode Ancient Greek Mathematical diagrams. He more recently worked as a research scientist in Illinois' Information Trust Institute.

For his dissertation at Dartmouth College, Gabe created eXtended Unix tools (XUTools) to process a broader class of languages in which security-policies are expressed in the language-theoretic sense. XUTools allows practitioners to extract, count, and compare files in terms of high-level language structures found in modern markup, programming, and configuration languages. Articles on XUTools have been featured in news outlets such as ComputerWorld, CIO Magazine, Communications of the ACM, and Slashdot.

Students win "Best Cyber Security Solution" award

Congratulations to PhD student Jason Reeves and undergrad Chris Frangieh, whose poster “TEDDI: Tamper Detection on Distributed Infrastructure” (based on Jason's thesis research) was voted one of two "Best Cyber Security Solutions" by Advanced Cyber Security Center Annual Conference attendees in November 2015.

Jason's work is part of the Department of Energy's Cyber Resilient Energy Delivery Consortium, of which Dartmouth is a member.

Explorations in Rapid Prototyping

COSC 89/189 Computational Fabrication was offered for the first time this Fall at Dartmouth, taught by Professor Emily Whiting. The course provided an in-depth study of 3D printing technology and cutting-edge research in computational methods for 3D design.

To culminate the term students presented independent design projects. The inventive array of products featured tileable gear art, smart gloves playing rock-paper-scissors, 3D mazes as light installation, a mobile app to create and simulate pop-ups, and much more. Students benefited from prototyping resources across campus including the Thayer School Machine Shop, Woodworking Shop and the Fabrication Lab in Sudikoff.

The DALI Lab and DEN Partner for The Pitch

The Pitch is a chance for members of the Dartmouth community to share their ideas, research, and innovations in hopes of receiving venture, design, development, and/or funding support. Each project has two minutes to share their project proposal with a panel of live judges from the Digital Arts Leadership and Innovation Lab (DALI), DEN, and a live audience. Winners of The Pitch will be chosen by both the judges and the audience.

The Pitch presents a unique opportunity for people to learn how their ideas and innovations can become a reality with the support of their community members and peers.

The Pitch will take place on Tuesday, November 4 from 5:00-6:30 PM in Loew Theater in the Black Family Visual Arts Center. Whether you're pitching your idea or interested in what others are presenting, we hope you'll join us to vote in the Pitch!

 

Graduate Teaching Award: Travis Peters

Travis Peters, a doctoral student in the Department of Computer Science, was selected as one of this year’s recipients of the Graduate Student Teaching Award.

Peters will be starting his second year as a PhD student this fall. While at Dartmouth, he has had the opportunity to work with Professor David Kotz on two different projects. This past winter, Peters began working on the development of a mobile health intervention application (or “app”) and wearable sensor for the Center for Technology and Behavioral Health (CTBH). The purpose of this invention is ultimately to aid people battling smoking addiction and cigarette cravings. The pilot study to test this app and sensor is slated to begin over the summer.

Navigating the Path Between Computer Science and Music

Dana Cook Grossman

In 1959, the British novelist and physicist Sir C.P. Snow gave a famous lecture ruing what he saw as a rift between society’s “two cultures”—the humanities and the sciences. Snow would surely be heartened, half a century later, by Dartmouth doctoral student Andy Sarroff. “I have one foot in the music department and one foot in the computer science department,” says Sarroff.

“I would describe myself as being in the field of music-information retrieval,” he continues. “It’s not such an old field—probably just about 15 years old. Its focus is taking music in whatever format it’s in and extracting meaningful information out of it. Usually, I’m working with digital audio—looking at the zeros and ones in digital audio and mapping the perception to the signal.”

Sarroff came to his interest in “zeros and ones” through his interest in notes and meter.

“Music was a gateway to computing for me. I’ve always played music,” he says.

He was a music major as an undergraduate at Wesleyan and then a recording engineer for eight years or so. He went on to earn a master’s degree in music technology at New York University.