The Use of Wearable Sensors and Systems in Stroke Rehabilitation

Dartmouth Events

The Use of Wearable Sensors and Systems in Stroke Rehabilitation

The use of wearable sensors has emerged as an objective tool to unobtrusively monitor upper limb performance in real-world settings. Sunghoon Ivan Lee, Umass Amherst.

Tuesday, October 2, 2018
8:45am-9:45am
Sudikoff Lab, Room 241
Intended Audience(s): Public
Categories: Lectures & Seminars

Abstract: Remote monitoring of upper limb performance in stroke survivors with hemiparesis (e.g., paretic vs. non-paretic limbs) can provide clinicians with information regarding the real-world impact of rehabilitation therapies. Specifically, accurate understanding of quantity (how much) and quality (how well) of upper limb use has potential to allow clinicians to administer individually-tailored therapeutic interventions that can maximize patients' motor performance during the performance of essential activities of daily living (ADLs) and thus, ultimately their quality of life and independent living.

The use of wearable sensors has emerged as an objective tool to unobtrusively monitor upper limb performance in real-world settings. However, current solutions demonstrate a number of technical limitations that hinder the translation and widespread use of wearable sensors in clinical practice.

In this talk, I will review state-of-the-art approaches in the objective measurement of real-world upper limb use based on wearable computing, followed by our own contributions to the field. Specifically, I will introduce our recent work in 1) novel data wearable sensor approaches to compute the quality and quantity of upper limb movement, and 2) novel passive (battery-less) wearable sensor development to capture fine hand movements.

Bio: Ivan Lee is an Assistant Professor of Computer Science at UMass Amherst since 2016. He received his PhD in Computer Science, MS in Computer Science, and MS in Electrical Engineering, all from the University of California Los Angeles in 2010, 2013, and 2014, respectively. From 2014 to 2016, he was a post-doctoral fellow in the Department of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation at Harvard Medical School.

Ivan is a recipient of the NSF CRII Award and NIH Trailblazer Award for Young Investigators. He is currently an Academic Editor of PLOS ONE. He is also serving as an elected Associate Member of the Technical Committee on Wearable Biomedical Sensors and System of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBS). Ivan has served as technical program committee members and workshop chairs for several flagship conferences in the area of wearable computing and health informatics. Ivan frequently serves on scientific review panels for funding agencies such as the NSF and NIH.

Ivan's research interests are in Mobile & Personalized Health, focusing on developing wearable sensors and data analytic methodologies to understand the health conditions associated with neurological, neuromuscular, or muscular skeleton disorders. With a primary focus on evolution, his specific research interests include 1) designing and implementing novel sensors and remote monitoring systems that are motivated by practical medical needs, 2) constructing appropriate clinical trials, and 3) analyzing the obtained data to quantify patients' conditions and validate the systems' clinical efficacy.

For more information, contact:
Sandra Hall

Events are free and open to the public unless otherwise noted.