awards

Themistoklis Haris '21 wins Town Prize in CS

Themis Haris '21 was selected by the Computer Science faculty as this year's winner of the Francis L. Town Scientific Prize in Computer Science.

This prize was established by the bequest of Francis L. Town, a member of the class of 1856 from Lancaster, New Hampshire, and is offered annually to "one meritorious and deserving student in each department of scientific study at the College" as of the end of the sophomore year.

As winner of the Town Prize, Themis joins a small group of very distinguished Dartmouth scientists. Congratulations!

Dartmouth team receives NSF grant for underwater robots

Alberto Quattrini Li (PI), Devin Balkcom (Co-PI), Xia Zhou (Co-PI), Bo Zhu (Co-PI), Jesse Casana (Anthropology, Co-PI), and Dave Lutz (Environmental Studies, Senior Personnel) were awarded a $400,000 NSF Major Research Instrumentation grant for acquiring marine multirobot systems for underwater monitoring and construction. 

The research enabled by the instruments to be acquired with this award is focused on exploration of techniques and principles that guide the development of algorithms and computational systems for control and design of water robots to study: underwater robotic construction or scaffolding to protect delicate ecologies; multirobot communication and coordination for monitoring; and underwater exploration and mapping.

The instrumentation acquired will provide opportunities to students at all levels with hands-on experience in research, programming, and experiential learning, and public outreach communicate the challenges and insights derived from field experiments.

More NSF Award info.

Robots and AI to support research on harmful blue-green algae

A team of scientists from research centers stretching from Maine to South Carolina will combine big data, artificial intelligence and robotics with new and time-tested techniques for lake sampling to understand where, when, and how cyanobacterial blooms form in lakes across the East Coast in a 4-year project supported by NSF ($3 million, renewable to $5.9 M).

The research team brings together experts in freshwater ecology, computer science, engineering and geospatial science from Bates College, Colby College, Dartmouth, the University of New Hampshire, the University of Rhode Island and the University of South Carolina.

Andrew Campbell Presented with SIGMOBILE Test of Time Award!

Andrew Campbell and his PhD students received the prestigious ACM SIGMOBILE Test-of-Time Award for their 2008 paper:

Miluzzo E, Lane ND, Fodor K, Peterson R, Lu H, Musolesi M, Eisenman SB, Zheng X, Campbell AT. "Sensing meets mobile social networks: the design, implementation and evaluation of the cenceme application." ACM SenSys, 2008.

The award citation states:

CenceMe was the first paper to demonstrate how smartphones can be used to derive rich behavioral insights continuously from onboard sensors. Since its publication, the work has inspired a huge body of research and commercial endeavors that has continued to increase the breadth and depth of personal sensing. Some of the activity inference methods that are now common in smartphone operating systems can be traced back to the original CenceMe system.

This is a seminal paper that spearheaded the field of smartphone sensing. Today, activity recognition is integrated into the operating system of every Android and iPhone.

Computer Science Has a Genuine Rock Star: Xia Zhou

Associate Professor of Computer Science Xia Zhou is a rock star, and now she has an award to prove it. 

The Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), the largest educational and scientific computing society in the world, has awarded Zhou the ACM SIGMOBILE's RockStar Award. SIGMOBILE is the ACM’s organizational division “dedicated to all things mobile.”

The ACM SIGMOBILE's RockStar award committee selected Zhou “in recognition of her outstanding early-career contributions and impact on our field: for multidisciplinary research examining unconventional wireless spectrum frequencies to build next-generation wireless systems and spearheading the field of ‘visible light sensing,’ which turns the ubiquitous light around us into a powerful medium that integrates data communication and human behavioral sensing. The RockStar Award is our community’s acknowledgement of the depth, impact, and novelty of Xia’s research,” writes Edward Knightly, chair of the award committee. 

Prof. Campbell Wins The ACM Sensys 2018 Test-of-Time Award

Andrew Campbell and his PhD students received the prestigious ACM SenSys 2018 Test-of-Time Award (10 year award) for their paper: “Sensing meets mobile social networks: the design, implementation and evaluation of the cenceme application”.

In 2008, when the App Store first opened Professor Campbell and his team released the CenceMe app, which implemented a machine learning algorithm directly on the iPhone for the first time to automatically detected the user’s behavior (e.g., sitting, walking, running, socializing). The app pushed this user context to Facebook and for the first time human behavior passively inferred from sensors embedded in smartphones was visible to friends in real-time.

The award citation states: “At the dawn of the smartphone era, this paper had the foresight to realize that smartphones are human companions and their sensors, collectively, can be used to derive novel social behavior insights. It also pioneered applying machine learning across local devices and servers”.

Today, activity recognition is integrated into the operating system of every Android and iPhone.

Student-created AI game Monad wins 2018 Kemeny Prize

The 2018 Kemeny prize winners are Kyle Dotterrer, Gabe Boning, Robin Jayaswal, Paul Spangfort, and Tong Xu for their team entry: Monad.  As they describe it:

Monad is an artificial intelligence programming challenge. The user-facing component of the project is a web client through which users upload code that implements an artificial intelligence agent (hereafter referred to as a “bot”) intended to effectively play an original game of our design. Once a user’s bot is uploaded, matches pitting a user’s bot against 1 – 3 others are generated, and each user’s standing and statistics on the platform are updated based on the results.

You can try it out yourselves at http://playmonad.com.

George Boateng ’16 receives MLK Jr. Social Justice Award for Emerging Leadership

Each year during the College’s annual celebration of Martin Luther King Jr., Dartmouth recognizes members of the community for their significant contributions toward peace, civil rights, education, public health, environmental justice, and social justice.

This year, George Boateng ’16, Thayer ’17, research scientist in the Department of Computer Science and co-founder and president of education nonprofit Nsesa Foundation received the Martin Luther King Jr. Social Justice Award for Emerging Leadership.

From the award:

Growing up in the small town of Winneba, Ghana, Boateng said, “The path to becoming a scientist or an engineer wasn’t really clear.” At Dartmouth, an “Engineering 21” course inspired him to create the Nsesa Foundation, which, among other initiatives, offers Ghanaian high school students summer programs in science and engineering, based on the “ENGS 21” hands-on learning model.

Neerja Thakkar '19 Wins Adobe Research Scholarship

To bring more gender diversity to the technology industry, Adobe Research created the Women-in-Technology Scholarship program to recognize outstanding undergraduate female students anywhere in the world who are studying computer science.

This year, Dartmouth CS's Neerja Thakkar '19, is one of just 10 students to win this award internationally.

Congratulations Neerja!

You can read more about the award and the other receipients at Adobe's website.

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