awards

Prof. Campbell Wins The ACM Sensys 2018 Test-of-Time Award

Andrew Campbell and his PhD students received the prestigious ACM SenSys 2018 Test-of-Time Award (10 year award) for their paper: “Sensing meets mobile social networks: the design, implementation and evaluation of the cenceme application”.

In 2008, when the App Store first opened Professor Campbell and his team released the CenceMe app, which implemented a machine learning algorithm directly on the iPhone for the first time to automatically detected the user’s behavior (e.g., sitting, walking, running, socializing). The app pushed this user context to Facebook and for the first time human behavior passively inferred from sensors embedded in smartphones was visible to friends in real-time.

The award citation states: “At the dawn of the smartphone era, this paper had the foresight to realize that smartphones are human companions and their sensors, collectively, can be used to derive novel social behavior insights. It also pioneered applying machine learning across local devices and servers”.

Today, activity recognition is integrated into the operating system of every Android and iPhone.

Student-created AI game Monad wins 2018 Kemeny Prize

The 2018 Kemeny prize winners are Kyle Dotterrer, Gabe Boning, Robin Jayaswal, Paul Spangfort, and Tong Xu for their team entry: Monad.  As they describe it:

Monad is an artificial intelligence programming challenge. The user-facing component of the project is a web client through which users upload code that implements an artificial intelligence agent (hereafter referred to as a “bot”) intended to effectively play an original game of our design. Once a user’s bot is uploaded, matches pitting a user’s bot against 1 – 3 others are generated, and each user’s standing and statistics on the platform are updated based on the results.

You can try it out yourselves at http://playmonad.com.

George Boateng ’16 receives MLK Jr. Social Justice Award for Emerging Leadership

Each year during the College’s annual celebration of Martin Luther King Jr., Dartmouth recognizes members of the community for their significant contributions toward peace, civil rights, education, public health, environmental justice, and social justice.

This year, George Boateng ’16, Thayer ’17, research scientist in the Department of Computer Science and co-founder and president of education nonprofit Nsesa Foundation received the Martin Luther King Jr. Social Justice Award for Emerging Leadership.

From the award:

Growing up in the small town of Winneba, Ghana, Boateng said, “The path to becoming a scientist or an engineer wasn’t really clear.” At Dartmouth, an “Engineering 21” course inspired him to create the Nsesa Foundation, which, among other initiatives, offers Ghanaian high school students summer programs in science and engineering, based on the “ENGS 21” hands-on learning model.

Neerja Thakkar '19 Wins Adobe Research Scholarship

To bring more gender diversity to the technology industry, Adobe Research created the Women-in-Technology Scholarship program to recognize outstanding undergraduate female students anywhere in the world who are studying computer science.

This year, Dartmouth CS's Neerja Thakkar '19, is one of just 10 students to win this award internationally.

Congratulations Neerja!

You can read more about the award and the other receipients at Adobe's website.

Margaret Lawson '18 named Finalist for CRA Award

Congratulations to Margaret Lawson '18, who was named as a Finalist for the Computing Research Association Outstanding Undergraduate Researcher Award. This award program recognizes undergraduate students in North American universities who show outstanding research potential in an area of computing research. Margaret was first author on the paper "EMPRESS—Extensible Metadata PRovider for Extreme-scale Scientific Simulation," and she delivered the talk at the 2017 Parallel Data Storage Workshop-Data Intensive Scalable Computing Workshop at the Supercomputing Conference SC'17. EMPRESS is a novel metadata service to support scientific discovery from extreme-scale scientific simulations.

Prof. Xia Zhou - "Rising Star in Networking and Communications"

Xia Zhou has been named one of N2Women's "Rising Stars in Networking and Communications" this year. The "N2Women: Rising Stars in Networking and Communications” list is an annual list that focuses on amazing women at the beginning of their careers.

Of course we at Dartmouth already knew this of Xia, but its nice to know others agree!

For 2017, in alphabetical order (by last name), here are the 10 N2Women: Rising Stars in Networking and Communications:

Prof. David Kotz and Kobby Essien Win Prestigious SIGMOBILE Test-of-Time Award

David Kotz and Kobby Essien received mobile computing's most prestigious award for their technical paper:  "Analysis of a Campus-wide Wireless Network".

From the SIGMOBILE website:

This paper was the first to systematically demonstrate how to measure and understand a production-scale wireless network, which was previously considered an impenetrable black box. This led to an incredible amount of follow-on work, with the measurement methods and analysis mechanisms proposed in this paper still being used. This paper was also the spark for the creation of the CRAWDAD data repository, which has been of immense value to the wireless research community.

Check out the full story, including information about the other awardees at the SIGMOBILE ToT award website

You can find more information about this research project at Dartmouth's campus-wide wireless network research page.

Hany Farid Honored by the National Academy of Inventors

From Dartmouth News:

Hany Farid, the Albert Bradley 1915 Third Century Professor and chair of the Department of Computer Science, has been named a fellow of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI).

NAI fellow status is granted to academic inventors “who have demonstrated a highly prolific spirit of innovation in creating or facilitating outstanding inventions that have made a tangible impact on quality of life, economic development, and the welfare of society.” NAI President Paul Sanberg wrote to Farid, “Congratulations on this great achievement and recognition as a truly prolific academic inventor.”

Hany Farid appointed to Endowed Chair

See the full coverage at Dartmouth Now.

Every year Dartmouth names a few of its top faculty to endowed professorships, recognizing their scholarship, teaching, and service to the College community as models of Dartmouth’s liberal arts ideal. We congratulate our very own Dr. Hany Farid, who was appointed to the Albert Bradley 1915 Third Century Professorship.

In the Dartmouth Now interview, Prof. Farid says:

Each fall I teach “Computer Science 1” to around 200 students. For many, this is their first introduction to programming, and about half are first-year students taking their first Dartmouth class. This is an awesome opportunity and responsibility to expose students to the power, creativity, and beauty that underlie our field. My goal is not to pump out more computer science majors, but to show all students—from the humanities, social sciences, and sciences—how computing can be leveraged to further their interests and passions, whatever they may be.

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