Faculty

Prof. Campbell Wins The ACM Sensys 2018 Test-of-Time Award

Andrew Campbell and his PhD students received the prestigious ACM SenSys 2018 Test-of-Time Award (10 year award) for their paper: “Sensing meets mobile social networks: the design, implementation and evaluation of the cenceme application”.

In 2008, when the App Store first opened Professor Campbell and his team released the CenceMe app, which implemented a machine learning algorithm directly on the iPhone for the first time to automatically detected the user’s behavior (e.g., sitting, walking, running, socializing). The app pushed this user context to Facebook and for the first time human behavior passively inferred from sensors embedded in smartphones was visible to friends in real-time.

The award citation states: “At the dawn of the smartphone era, this paper had the foresight to realize that smartphones are human companions and their sensors, collectively, can be used to derive novel social behavior insights. It also pioneered applying machine learning across local devices and servers”.

Today, activity recognition is integrated into the operating system of every Android and iPhone.

Graduate Students Create Computer-Chip Security Fix

Dartmouth computer science graduate students are applying their research techniques to fundamental security flaws recently found in nearly every computer chip manufactured in the last 20 years—flaws that they say could prove catastrophic if exploited by malicious hackers.

The researchers are coming to grips with a design flaw that ultimately falls into the province of the chip manufacturers—such industry giants as Intel and AMD. Until new designs are implemented, an interim solution devised at Dartmouth can fill the breach.

The research team includes two PhD students, Prashant Anantharaman and Ira Ray Jenkins, and Rebecca Shapiro, Guarini ’18, who received her PhD this past spring. Professor of Computer Science Sean Smith and Research Associate Professor Sergey Bratus advised the team.

Read the whole article over at Dartmouth News.

The Danger of Predictive Algorithms in Criminal Justice

Predictive algorithms may help us shop, discover new music or literature, but do they belong in the courthouse? Dartmouth professor Hany Farid reverse engineers the inherent dangers and potential biases of recommendations engines built to mete out justice in today's criminal justice system.

Check out the TEDx video on Youtube:

 

Tracking Down Fake Videos

Prof. Farid recently talked with NPR's All Things Considered about deep-fake videos.

From the article:

In all Tech Considered, we continue our look this month at the many ways tech can be used to influence or undermine democracy. Today - deep fake videos. The Defense Department considers them enough of a concern that it's working with outside experts on ways to detect them and prevent them from being made. Hany Farid is a computer science professor at Dartmouth College involved in the project. Welcome to All Things Considered.

Listen to the full interview at NPR.

Disney Movie Magic Leads to Dartmouth Digital Research

Dartmouth News is running a profile of CS Assistant Professor Wojciech Jarosz.

From the story:

Wojciech Jarosz is fascinated by the behavior of light and the interplay with its environment, an interest that led to his involvement in the movies TangledFrozen, and Big Hero 6 during the six years he spent with Disney Research Zürich before joining the faculty at Dartmouth.

“I want to understand why things look the way they do, how we can simulate their interaction with light, and how we can reproduce that appearance,” says Jarosz.

This quest has taken him to a domain where technology and art complement each other. “I try to figure out how light bounces around in physical scenes and try to write efficient algorithms that will simulate those actions and create images,” he says.

Prof. Andrew Campbell Finds a Lot to Learn During His Year at Google

Dartmouth News is running a story about our very own Prof. Andrew Campbell's experience during his year-long leave at Google.

From the story:

Campbell took a year’s leave from the Department of Computer Science last year to step into the fast lane at Google, writing software and looking for new ideas. He also wanted to see how Dartmouth’s computer science curriculum stacked up against the needs of industry. To do that, he took off the mantle of academia and became a software engineer again. “I got back to my roots and spent a year writing code. It was a grounding experience,” he says.

“We sit in our ivory tower, a bit disconnected from what’s going on in the real world, and I wondered how rusty we were in terms of the topics we teach and the research we do, and whether it is really relevant,” he says. What he found was both validating—many alumni now work at Google, for example—and illuminating.

Read the full story here.

Can Algorithms Accurately Predict Crime?

Julia Dressel ’17 and Professor Hany Farid caution that the computer algorithms may be no more accurate at predicting recidivism than people with no criminal justice experience. “What we’ve shown should give the courts some pause,” Farid tells The Atlantic.

See the Science Advances article and The Atlantic article for more.

Prof. Hany Farid honored as a 2018 Fellow of the IEEE

Hany Farid has just been elected an IEEE Fellow “for seminal contributions to the field of photo-forensics and its application to fighting the exploitation of children around the globe.”

Hany is being recognized for his research in image analysis and digital forensics, a field he pioneered at Dartmouth. Among many other things, Hany has developed mathematical and computational techniques to determine whether images, videos, or audio recordings have been altered. A noteworthy application was Hany's forensic analysis that demonstrated the authenticity of a controversial photograph of Lee Harvey Oswald holding the alleged assassination rifle. Hany also helped develop a system to find and remove online images pertaining to child exploitation, and is developing a system to scrub the internet of extremist-related content.

“Hany’s research is both technically groundbreaking and incredibly impactful,” says Interim Provost David Kotz ’86, the Champion International Professor in the Department of Computer Science. “Congratulations to him. This is a great honor.”

Prof. Farid Named to NH Magazine's People of the Year

“What is truth?” asked Pontius Pilate at the trial of Jesus Christ. You’d think that in the past two millennia we’d have gotten better at knowing, but technology is a two-edged sword in this respect. “The forensics guy and the forger share similar skillsets,” says Hany Farid, a professor of computer science at Dartmouth College who is one of the foremost experts on unraveling the digital mazes constructed to conceal or alter images and sound. And tools of the trade that once belonged to the hacker are now available at the app store.

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