faculty research

Joint-Monitoring Fabric Gets NSF ‘Awesome Discoveries’ Shout-Out

From Dartmouth news by David Hirsch and Bill Platt:

A smart fabric developed at Dartmouth that can help athletes and physical therapy patients reduce arm injuries and accelerate recovery was highlighted in the National Science Foundation’s “4 Awesome Discoveries You Probably Didn’t Hear About This Week” social media campaign.

Created by Associate Professor of Computer Science Xia Zhou and the team in her Dartnets lab, the fabric-sensing system is a wearable, low-cost motion-capture textile that monitors joint rotation, making it ideal for athletes or for patients recuperating from injuries.

The NSF YouTube “4 Awesome Discoveries” episode shows how the off-the-shelf sensing fabric is fitted with a micro-controller that can be easily detached to transfer data and could be further miniaturized to “fit inside a button.”

Computer Science Has a Genuine Rock Star: Xia Zhou

Associate Professor of Computer Science Xia Zhou is a rock star, and now she has an award to prove it. 

The Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), the largest educational and scientific computing society in the world, has awarded Zhou the ACM SIGMOBILE's RockStar Award. SIGMOBILE is the ACM’s organizational division “dedicated to all things mobile.”

The ACM SIGMOBILE's RockStar award committee selected Zhou “in recognition of her outstanding early-career contributions and impact on our field: for multidisciplinary research examining unconventional wireless spectrum frequencies to build next-generation wireless systems and spearheading the field of ‘visible light sensing,’ which turns the ubiquitous light around us into a powerful medium that integrates data communication and human behavioral sensing. The RockStar Award is our community’s acknowledgement of the depth, impact, and novelty of Xia’s research,” writes Edward Knightly, chair of the award committee. 

New research lets artists create more realistic and controllable CGI

A new theory based on the physics of cloud formation and neutron scattering could help animators create more lifelike movies, according to a Dartmouth-led study. Software developed using the technique focuses on how light interacts with microscopic particles to develop computer-generated images.

The work was conduced by Dartmouth's Visual Computing Laboratory in collaboration with researchers from Pixar, Disney Research, ETH Zurich and Cornell University. A research paper detailing the advancement was just published in the journal Transactions on Graphics and will be presented at SIGGRAPH Asia by Dartmouth CS PhD student Benedikt Bitterli tomorrow, December 6 in Tokyo, Japan.

Watch the quick "fast forward" video below that summarizes the technique:

Prof. Campbell Wins The ACM Sensys 2018 Test-of-Time Award

Andrew Campbell and his PhD students received the prestigious ACM SenSys 2018 Test-of-Time Award (10 year award) for their paper: “Sensing meets mobile social networks: the design, implementation and evaluation of the cenceme application”.

In 2008, when the App Store first opened Professor Campbell and his team released the CenceMe app, which implemented a machine learning algorithm directly on the iPhone for the first time to automatically detected the user’s behavior (e.g., sitting, walking, running, socializing). The app pushed this user context to Facebook and for the first time human behavior passively inferred from sensors embedded in smartphones was visible to friends in real-time.

The award citation states: “At the dawn of the smartphone era, this paper had the foresight to realize that smartphones are human companions and their sensors, collectively, can be used to derive novel social behavior insights. It also pioneered applying machine learning across local devices and servers”.

Today, activity recognition is integrated into the operating system of every Android and iPhone.

Eye-Tracking Glasses Giving New Vision for Augmented Reality

High power consumption and cost have kept eye trackers out of current augmented reality systems. By using near-infrared lights and photodiodes DartNets Lab has created an energy-efficient, wearable system that tracks rapid eye movements and allows hands-free input of system commands.

The glasses, which can also help monitor human health, was introduced at MobiCom 2018 taking place from October 29-November 2 in New Delhi, India.

Graduate Students Create Computer-Chip Security Fix

Dartmouth computer science graduate students are applying their research techniques to fundamental security flaws recently found in nearly every computer chip manufactured in the last 20 years—flaws that they say could prove catastrophic if exploited by malicious hackers.

The researchers are coming to grips with a design flaw that ultimately falls into the province of the chip manufacturers—such industry giants as Intel and AMD. Until new designs are implemented, an interim solution devised at Dartmouth can fill the breach.

The research team includes two PhD students, Prashant Anantharaman and Ira Ray Jenkins, and Rebecca Shapiro, Guarini ’18, who received her PhD this past spring. Professor of Computer Science Sean Smith and Research Associate Professor Sergey Bratus advised the team.

Read the whole article over at Dartmouth News.

The Danger of Predictive Algorithms in Criminal Justice

Predictive algorithms may help us shop, discover new music or literature, but do they belong in the courthouse? Dartmouth professor Hany Farid reverse engineers the inherent dangers and potential biases of recommendations engines built to mete out justice in today's criminal justice system.

Check out the TEDx video on Youtube:

 

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