faculty research

Graduate Students Create Computer-Chip Security Fix

Dartmouth computer science graduate students are applying their research techniques to fundamental security flaws recently found in nearly every computer chip manufactured in the last 20 years—flaws that they say could prove catastrophic if exploited by malicious hackers.

The researchers are coming to grips with a design flaw that ultimately falls into the province of the chip manufacturers—such industry giants as Intel and AMD. Until new designs are implemented, an interim solution devised at Dartmouth can fill the breach.

The research team includes two PhD students, Prashant Anantharaman and Ira Ray Jenkins, and Rebecca Shapiro, Guarini ’18, who received her PhD this past spring. Professor of Computer Science Sean Smith and Research Associate Professor Sergey Bratus advised the team.

Read the whole article over at Dartmouth News.

The Danger of Predictive Algorithms in Criminal Justice

Predictive algorithms may help us shop, discover new music or literature, but do they belong in the courthouse? Dartmouth professor Hany Farid reverse engineers the inherent dangers and potential biases of recommendations engines built to mete out justice in today's criminal justice system.

Check out the TEDx video on Youtube:

 

Disney Movie Magic Leads to Dartmouth Digital Research

Dartmouth News is running a profile of CS Assistant Professor Wojciech Jarosz.

From the story:

Wojciech Jarosz is fascinated by the behavior of light and the interplay with its environment, an interest that led to his involvement in the movies TangledFrozen, and Big Hero 6 during the six years he spent with Disney Research Zürich before joining the faculty at Dartmouth.

“I want to understand why things look the way they do, how we can simulate their interaction with light, and how we can reproduce that appearance,” says Jarosz.

This quest has taken him to a domain where technology and art complement each other. “I try to figure out how light bounces around in physical scenes and try to write efficient algorithms that will simulate those actions and create images,” he says.

New Technique Shedding Light on Body Language

A joint research team from the University of Cambridge and Dartmouth College has developed a system for using infrared light tags to monitor face-to-face interactions. The technique could lead to a more precise understanding of how individuals interact in social settings and can increase the effectiveness of communications coaching.

The system, named Protractor by the Cambridge-Dartmouth team, uses invisible light to record how people employ body language by measuring body angles and distances between individuals.

Prior studies have revealed that body language can influence many aspects of everyday life including job interviews, doctor-patient conversations and team projects. Each setting includes a specific set of interaction details such as eye contact and hand gestures for which an accurate monitoring of distance and relative orientation is crucial.

Body language is already commonly studied through video sessions, audio recordings and paper questionnaires. Compared to the new, light-based system, these approaches can require invasive cameras, necessitate complex infrastructure support, and impose high burdens on users.

Exploring Applications of Technology in Health and Wellness

Dartmouth News is running an article about George Boateng ’16, Thayer ’17, and how he is using his CS and engineering degrees to make a difference in education and health in the developing world.

From the article:

George Boateng ’16, Thayer ’17, arrived at Dartmouth in 2012 with an agenda. He had come 5,000 miles, seeking ways to make a difference in education and health in the developing world—in his native Ghana, in particular.

At Dartmouth, he gained hands-on experience in computer science and engineering in a place where his work had the potential to produce real-world applications. Boateng proceeded to blaze a trail marked by accolades for his research and recognition for his humanitarian accomplishments. Most recently, he won Dartmouth’s Martin Luther King Jr. Social Justice Award for Emerging Leadershipfor his work as co-founder and president of the nonprofit Nsesa Foundation.

Can Algorithms Accurately Predict Crime?

Julia Dressel ’17 and Professor Hany Farid caution that the computer algorithms may be no more accurate at predicting recidivism than people with no criminal justice experience. “What we’ve shown should give the courts some pause,” Farid tells The Atlantic.

See the Science Advances article and The Atlantic article for more.

Prof. Hany Farid honored as a 2018 Fellow of the IEEE

Hany Farid has just been elected an IEEE Fellow “for seminal contributions to the field of photo-forensics and its application to fighting the exploitation of children around the globe.”

Hany is being recognized for his research in image analysis and digital forensics, a field he pioneered at Dartmouth. Among many other things, Hany has developed mathematical and computational techniques to determine whether images, videos, or audio recordings have been altered. A noteworthy application was Hany's forensic analysis that demonstrated the authenticity of a controversial photograph of Lee Harvey Oswald holding the alleged assassination rifle. Hany also helped develop a system to find and remove online images pertaining to child exploitation, and is developing a system to scrub the internet of extremist-related content.

“Hany’s research is both technically groundbreaking and incredibly impactful,” says Interim Provost David Kotz ’86, the Champion International Professor in the Department of Computer Science. “Congratulations to him. This is a great honor.”

Dartmouth to debut wearables that warn and wow at UIST 2017

A watch that works in multiple dimensions and a smart ring that provides calendar alerts are among the top technology Dartmouth College will bring to the 30th ACM User Interface Software and Technology Symposium (UIST 2017).

Other technology to be introduced by the Dartmouth team includes a thumb-tip recognition technique that optimizes interaction with computer applications.

The research projects, products of Dartmouth's human computer interface lab, have been chosen by UIST 2017 to feature alongside some of the world's most innovative technology.

"Understanding and improving how humans interact with computers are essential parts of technology development," said Xing-Dong Yang, assistant professor of computer science at Dartmouth. "We look forward to UIST as a unique opportunity to share ideas on innovation."

See details in EurekAlert.

Prof. Campbell wins 3 new grants for $13M on mobile sensing

During 2016-2017 Professor Andrew Campbell took leave from Dartmouth and joined Google and Verily (Google's life science startup) as a visiting research scientist working in the Android group in Mountain View on new wearables and at Verily in South San Francisco on mental health sensing. Now back at Dartmouth he is busy working on 3 new awards from NIH and IARPA with students in the DartNet lab.

The new projects include a collaboration between Dartmouth CS and the Tuck business school funded by IARPA to study collaboration in the workplace using mobile phones, wearables and specialized IOT devices. Another project funded by NIH between Dartmouth CS and UW is investigating auditory verbal hallucination using mobile phones. Finally, we are following 100 undergrads across their 4 years at Dartmouth College as part of another NIH funded project with PBS to study the stress and strain of undergraduate students.

Prof. David Kotz and Kobby Essien Win Prestigious SIGMOBILE Test-of-Time Award

David Kotz and Kobby Essien received mobile computing's most prestigious award for their technical paper:  "Analysis of a Campus-wide Wireless Network".

From the SIGMOBILE website:

This paper was the first to systematically demonstrate how to measure and understand a production-scale wireless network, which was previously considered an impenetrable black box. This led to an incredible amount of follow-on work, with the measurement methods and analysis mechanisms proposed in this paper still being used. This paper was also the spark for the creation of the CRAWDAD data repository, which has been of immense value to the wireless research community.

Check out the full story, including information about the other awardees at the SIGMOBILE ToT award website

You can find more information about this research project at Dartmouth's campus-wide wireless network research page.

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